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The Dogs’ Best Friend?

Chapter 1 and 2 of Lessons Learned from Dogs

Max's Scout Services & Communications of the Americas WebBlog

 


By David A. Dailey with Fulla Bull T. Teddy Iz Rumpkin

Table of Contents for Lessons Learned From Dogs

Table of Contents from the humorous book “Lessons Learned From Dogs”

Chapter One -Stay Alert, Yet Relaxed

Chapter Two -Insomnia? Fall Asleep Anywhere

Chapter Three    -Loyalty

Chapter Four   -Fun Times and Play

Chapter Five   -Eating and Drinking

Chapter Six  -City Dogs

Chapter Seven   -Country Dogs

Chapter Eight    -Mischief and Wisdom

Chapter Nine   -The Finale

Chapter 1 – “Stay Alert, Yet Relaxed”

“Dogs are mans’ best friend, “ said an anonymous sage observer many years ago.

Dogs use all their senses, sometimes in mysterious and amazing ways, which human beings are unable to comprehend. Nonetheless we appreciate and benefit from them.

Look, listen, and watch your dog because you will learn some valuable lessons. This book includes many things I and others have learned with the help of our dogs about life.

Dogs live in the moment. Humans are…

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Estrella Vista / The Redemption Project / “Wandervogel Diary”

“Estrella Vista”

800 Seaman Road

HC-65, Box 243 A

Alpine, TX  79830

 

(432) 371-4257

 

DaileySun@outlook.com

 

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

img_20161211_180849

Dear Family, Friends, and Supporters,

 

I have just witnessed my second-in-a-row fantastic moon sets from Estrella Vista.

Last night was a full moon on a clear and slightly warmer midnight than the two nights

before. It is not yet 7 a.m. and the eastern sky is beginning to show great colors of reds,

yellows, and oranges.

 

This is a magnificent estate which my brother created to help young men and women,

who endured child abuse and then had to be prosecuted as adults for murders they were

led to do while children. Fairness in American justice may never be achieved but giving

perociles a chance to lead more normal lives can be a reality. Estrella Vista stands today

– without its visionary founder – as that beacon of safety, security, and hope.

 

So in the spirit of keeping the beacon burning bright, I am asking”Wandervogel Diary”

readers to respond with their best efforts to keep the vision, mission, goals, and

projects of The Redemption Project moving into the right direction.

 

Your support of new administrators of the project, Dan’s son Henry,

and many others working on the project will be appreciated very much.

Where ever I may be, I will be praying, thinking positive, and looking

forward to reading about your future successes.

 

All the best,

 

 

David A. F. N. “Buck” Dailey

Founder of “The Dailey Sun-Chronicles”

http://www.MaxsScoutServicesLLC.wordpress.com

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Animals Can Learn Me All Needed To No

Lessons that do not have to be learned by humans
“the hard way.”

Max's Scout Services & Communications of the Americas WebBlog

Dog Wisdom: See Lessons Learned From Dogs by David A. Dailey

Talking Turkey:

(1) Treat a dead chicken like a tom turkey.

Rub it down real good in salt and water before cooking.

(2) Don’t look up staring at a rainstorm.

     From  my Cats Ozzie, Ray, Maxine, Snowball, et.al:

(1) If you don’t like where you are at now, move.

(2) There is no such thing as loneliness; solitude is a great thing.

(3) If you want something, speak up. It does not hurt to ask.

(4) If you shit up, it is your ship – cover it up.

Learned Horses Brandywine and Dawn Dailey:

(1) Eat well and often.

(2) Be dependable.

(3) Demonstrate grace, passion, strength, inner beauty, and talents.

     Razorback Hogs:

(1) Roll in your own shit and you will smell like yourself.

(2) If you mind your manners and keep your hocks clean, you may…

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Factors of Senior Health & Safety & Happiness Longevity

the things we learn from old I.U.

Max's Scout Services & Communications of the Americas WebBlog

Factors of Senior Health . . .

robinWilliams

Item #A – “Seniors”, for lack of a better term, have some commonalities:

  • Set in own ways
  • Know what they like.
  • Some level of frustration with their loss of skills and physiological facilities:

Physical, psychological, cognitive thinking, and others

Item # B – Issues: What is real?

Righteous expectations.

Re think…

Is it time to embrace change?

Item # C – Solutions may be a combination of these eight dimensions of wellness ^ ^ ^ (courtesy of the I.U. School of Public Health).

“What is the greatest of these,” Jesus Christ might ask?

Item # D – Whatssup?

Apply :

  • Wisdom,
  • Experience,
  • Senior ingenuity,
  • Veteran skills,

Item # E – Senior Ergonomics

Use of tools, techniques, resources, and cognition to make living tasks easier.

  • Loss of hand strength >>> easy open bottles, cans, medicines
  • Loss of teeth>>>> select recipes that can be easily chewed and digested; cut foods into smaller bites;
  • Loss of mobility >>>> walkers, canes
  • Loss of cognitive skills >>>> use of wisdom, experience, senior ingenuity
  • Loss of taste>>> spices

  • Loss of dexterity >>>> tools, methods
  • Loss of sight >>> glasses, virtual reality goggles,
  • Loss of hearing >>>> aids, signage, vibrations

– – –

copyright MMXVI – Max’s Scout Services and Communications of the Americas, LLC

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The Democratic Party: Let it Burn — Armory of the Revolution

Originally posted on Social Justice Otaku: The DNC is crumbling. They’re on fire and they’re desperately putting water on it while pretending everything is fine. They put the blame on the voters, even though it’s a fact that their demise is their own doing. If you don’t listen to the people you’re suppose to represent,…

via The Democratic Party: Let it Burn — Armory of the Revolution

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derailing?

TRUMP’S MOUTH IS FILTHY

Wandervogel Diary

14TRUMP1-master768.

Inside the Failing Mission to Tame Donald Trump’s Tongue

by Alexander Burns and Maggie Haberman, The New York Times

August 13, 2016

Donald J. Trump was in a state of shock: He had just fired his campaign manager and was watching the man discuss his dismissal at length on CNN. The rattled candidate’s advisers and family seized the moment for an intervention.

Joined by his daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, a cluster of Mr. Trump’s confidants pleaded with him to make that day—June 20—a turning point.

He would have to stick to a teleprompter and end his freestyle digressions and insults, like his repeated attacks on a Hispanic federal judge. Paul Manafort, Mr. Trump’s campaign chairman, and Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey argued that Mr. Trump had an effective message, if only he would deliver it. For now, the campaign’s polling showed, too many voters described…

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Excerpt from Cookbook: Confessions of An Oenophile

Cookbook available for purchase through Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or Outskirts Press.

Phorward

This cookbook has been in the oven for over 100 years.

My family has a tradition of eating well no matter what.

My Grandma was born in June 1903.

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There are too many people for me to thank for everything. I’ll start with my Grandmothers, my mother who passed away in the 90’s, and my dad who died in his sleep in the 80’s. I’d also like to publicly thank my mother-in-law, too. Grandmother Baker raised five bright healthy children. Grandma Bruggner had eleven grandkids and Grandma Dailey had five of us. Special thanks to my daughter Anessa, older brother Dan, and sister Christine! Also, you know who you are in Healdsburg, California.

If you are shopping for recipes to barbeque or microwave, this is not the book for you.

If you have food allergies, I can appreciate those. Me, myself, and I am deathly allergic to nuts, mustard, and some strawberries. So these All-American recipes can be embellished with these ingredients if you wish. Just do not expect me to touch the nuts.

Thank heavens that few nuts are grown where I was born and raised in Indiana.

Unlike the Pottowatomie Indians, my school chums and I never ate tree nuts or grown acorns from oak trees. We spent more time playing in poison ivy.

I truly believe that eating American food is good for us. All that obesity talk is heavy. I used to weigh 328 pounds. In the three years since my gastric bypass surgery, I have lost 122 pounds. So eating is one of my problems. Thus a series of dinner parties and one “coast-to-coast virtual dinner was held on 9-1-07. Recipes from India, mushrooms, some strawberries and shrimp were some of my favorites but unfortunately I cannot digest some things without sad symptoms. So what I chose to eat is important principally because I must not overeat too much food, few fast foods or drink a lot of liquids.

Speaking of liquids, I highly recommend all kinds of wine! For over eleven months, I have immersed myself in the Northern California wine culture by living right in the center of it. Talking with chefs along the Wine Country. Learning from them, winemakers and specialists in wine tasting rooms. Gratitude is due to everyone I met along the wine roads of Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, and Monterey Counties in California. Prior to moving to Wine Country, I lived about 20 years in California’s beautiful San Mateo County and seven years in San Francisco. Personally, I remain a Hoosier but believe I am a Californian that you can trust your stomachs to.

Preface

 

This cookbook has been in the works for decades. As a “latchkey kid” long before the term was popularized, I was preparing meals for myself from age ten or so. I would like to be able to claim that I learned the kitchen basics at my mother’s elbow, but the truth is I found my way reading cookbooks and through trial-and-error.

 

When I inherited my mother’s and grandmother’s recipes on index cards, I took it upon myself to reconstruct my family’s kitchen legacy which had previously only been preserved in the hearts and memories of our family and friends.

 

Thus, a fair amount of contemporary thought and planning has gone into this cookbook, and it has been shaped by my own tastes and interests. For example, it has been my goal to put together a practical family cookbook using wine as an important ingredient in a wide variety of menus. I live in the wine country of northern California, where wine is an important influence in the whole culture. I have therefore taken our old family meals and embellished them accordingly.

 

I have also tended to focus on “comfort foods” which, though some people accuse this use of food as being inherently unhealthy, can be made increasingly beneficial if only the cook will think about how home-grown produce and local ingredients can be integrated and experiment with them. I therefore have included recipes which use those foods and ingredients that are available, not only to us in California, but in the Midwestern, Southern and the Atlantic states.

 

We are entering an era in which rising transportation costs and food safety concerns will likely change our ways with food.  These recipes limit the mandatory use of gourmet, exotic, and hard-to-find ingredients. I have, in fact, organized the book according to the seasons of the year when local ingredients are more likely to be “in season.”

 

I can recall during college that my dear future wife tried baking homemade wheat bread. Too bad she got confused between baking powder and baking soda; we ended up using the loaves as doorstops. Remember to have a sense of humor in the kitchen – no matter what may happen.

 

 

Fall 2007